samadoni
Hi,

Is there a way to access the Xgen guide data with soup? (IGS or legacy Xgen)

thanks 
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pshipkov
This came up couple of times already, but never had the time to get to it.
Adding another note to my to-do list.
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samadoni
thanks
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pshipkov
Looking right now at this and other related requests.
Can you provide couple of user stories about how SOuP can improve your XGEN workflow.
Specific cases like - if i could access grooming data and modify it in such and such way, etc.
Thanks.
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samadoni

My main concern would be about scattering geometry/particles along the fur to simulate accumulated dirt or snow.

On a second/minor note and hacky way, would be to use the xgen IGS and it's sets of brushes to control legacy Xgen guides( the spline mode) . 

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Bruce Lee
Last year I used xgen to make hair on a yak.

According to the plan, the director's request is a layer of snow on the hair, but xgen itself can not accomplish such a thing.

I also hope that Soup can extract the xgen information. Then we can combine xgen with Soup to make more interesting effects on the hair.

For example, hair on the second growth of hair, and even hair growth. With Soup, we can make procedural hair effects. Or, there is snow on the hair. More interesting stuff
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gue

fur tools often provide a way to place snow or any instances along the curve u param of a fur fibre, ie curve. Thats' the way it works in the Yeti plugin for Maya, doable in Houdini as well. Xgen, too?

Workflow example: a feature that houdini is implementing in their revised groom tools is querying the deforming topology of the parent mesh to drive nodes in the groom. Multipliers based on edge angles, curvature, stretch, compression, etc comparing to  a rest pose presumably. Soup-wise: piping the output (colorPerVertex) from the tension node into the fur evaluation to drive the fur properties based on the animation.

Another case/idea: long fur could bend more strongly in areas where a character has a lot of deformation itself (kness, elbows), the edge angles could provide a value to drive the bend or general direction of fur, minimising the need to create a corrective groom with combing tools for a good silhouette.

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